It’s a Mystery: Five, A Novel, by Ursula Archer

Five: A Novel

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A refinement of letterboxing, geocaching is a popular worldwide hobby that involves using GPS to hide and find small containers holding a logbook and, often, a small object that the finder can trade for another small object of equal value. The location coordinates are provided on a listing website, where finders can post about their hunt.

In Five, the caches contain human body parts. A geocacher, dubbed The Owner by the Salzburg police, dumps a body in a cow pasture, with a sequence of numbers tattooed on her feet. The investigative team, led by Beatrice Kaspary, soon figures out that the numbers are GPS coordinates, and, led by a rookie who’s into geocaching, they manage to make their first gruesome discovery. Along with a bloody hand, the killer provides a riddle, which when solved, will lead the cops to the next victim. And the next… DI Kaspary and her assistant, Florin Wessinger, will come to realize that the victims knew each other, but that’s all they have to go on.

Gritty and suspenseful, Five is a complex mystery with a flawed but personable protagonist. She and Florin make an efficient team, and there are some strong hints that their relationship will develop beyond the professional. When it becomes clear that The Owner is watching her, Beatrice begins to fear for the safety of her children. It’s possible for the reader to narrow down the roster of possible perpetrators, but I wasn’t certain till the end which of the two I suspected was guilty. An original premise with plenty to captivate and entertain those who open the covers of this thriller. It may also encourage some to take up a new hobby!

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It’s a Mystery: The Silkworm, by Robert Galbraith

The Silkworm (Cormoran Strike, #2)

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Cormoran Strike is a most interesting PI. A former investigator for the Royal Military, he lost a leg in Afghanistan and has now set up shop on his own. He’s tough, certainly, but also fair-minded and personable. He’s also the illegitimate son of a famous rock star. His newest case has been brought to his door by the wife of a pretentious but un-prolific author, Owen Quine, who’s disappeared after the rejection of his much anticipated new manuscript, Bombyx Mori , which translates to Silkworm. Strike is not at all sure that Mrs. Quine can pay, but he accepts the case anyway, and soon finds out that there are plenty of people in the world of publishing who might harbor animosity toward the writer. Bombyx, it seems, is a sort of pornographic allegory in which they all all appear as nasty caricatures of themselves.

The Silkworm is a mystery with literary features, the title itself a metaphor for the rat race of writing and publishing. Cormoran is the name of the giant that the famous Jack killed at St. Michael’s Mount in Cornwall. It takes a long time for Strike to discover what happened to Quine, and when he does, life mimics fiction in a very effective fashion. He receives indispensable insights and assistance from his office manager, Robin, who is a PI wanna be who clearly has the right stuff, if only Strike would realize it. Robin’s engagement to the selfish, narrow minded Matthew, serves as a subplot, and leads to speculation about whether Robin and Strike will follow up on the attraction they feel but do not openly acknowledge.
The Silkworm is a suspenseful and engaging, and I read it without knowing that it’s author is actually J. K. Rowling. I’m able, therefore, to review it objectively, and am prompted now to read the prequel, The Cuckoo’s Calling. Rowling clearly did not use up her story-telling abilities on Harry Potter, and she can write for adults quite well.

4 stars because of a bit of a lag in the middle.

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It’s a Mystery: The Cruelest Month, by Louise Penny

The Cruelest Month (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #3)

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The Canadian village of Three Pines may be idyllic, but it’s not immune from murder. As T.S. Elliott so famously wrote, “April is the cruelest month,” and as Easter approaches, the residents decide to hold a seance to rid their vacant, creepy manor house of the malevolent spirits that have wreaked such havoc among them. It’s a daunting prospect, but something that must be done. One of their number dies of fright, and early the next morning, Inspector Armande Gamache arrives on what has by now become for him a familiar crime scene.

The charm of Louise Penny’s series derives from her eloquent writing style. This woman knows her way around words. She breathes atmosphere into her setting and humanity into her characters, and her plots are always intricate enough to sustain the mystery even after you think you know who did it. Gamache has to be one of the warmest, most ethical and understanding detectives ever invented. His success is due to his principles, one of which is that murder always starts with a secret. Penny doesn’t shrink from illuminating his flaws, however, which makes him all the more human. The murder at the center of The Cruelest Month has him genuinely puzzled, and events during the investigation leave him wondering whom among his team can be trusted. Gamache, of course, eventually prevails, but not without some ingenious plotting of his own. As another famous author, Norman Mailer, once wrote,”In searching for the truth be ready for the unexpected.”

It’s not necessary to read the Three Pines novels in order, but that’s the way to get the most out of everything that Penny does so well.

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It’s a Mystery: The Secret History, by Donna Tartt

 

The Secret History
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Richard Papen is chronically depressed, a loser in his own eyes. Penniless, he leaves his native California and his dismissive parents for Hampden College in New Hampshire, where he hopes to reinvent himself. Still very much a fish out of water, his knowledge of the language of ancient Greece eventually comes to the attention of the school’s elite, a group of five wealthy students who study all things Greek under the tutelage of distinguished scholar Julian Delgado. To Richard’s astonishment and delight, he’s invited into this exclusive coterie. Soon, as a result of the mythology and philosophy in which the students become immersed, one of the group will die at the hands of his fellows. This is the secret. As narrator, Richard’s job is to guide readers along on the journey that leads to murder and its inevitable tragic aftermath. This is the history.

The Secret History owes much to such classic forerunners as Crime and Punishment, Brideshead Revisited, and Lord of the Flies, as well as the body of Greek Mythology. To the credit of its author, however, this mystery cum coming of age tale is no mere derivative.

This is an accomplished first novel. Yes, it has its problems. The plot, though certainly compelling, is not complex enough to warrant nearly 600 pages, and it drags in places toward the middle. Readers who expect to “like” the characters will probably not like The Secret History; while they each possess a level of intellectual brilliance, morally they are bankrupt. Self-appointed elitists, the totality of their self absorption will ruin them all. Except for Richard, whose self-contempt paralyzes him to the point that he watches their actions as though watching a game or a movie. But Ms. Tartt is spot on in her portrayal of the 1980’s texture of life at a small town college during a snowy winter, well enough to invoke some nostalgia for my own college days. While revealing the secret in the prologue saps the story of suspense, knowing what will happen evokes a strong sense of dread that grows as the plot plays out, rather like watching a snake from a distance when you know it might strike. Rather like we do whenever any heinous act splashes itself across our television screens.

Fascinating work by a talented writer. Can’t believe I didn’t read it earlier.

It’s a Mystery: W is for Wasted, by Sue Grafton

W is for Wasted (Kinsey Millhone #23)

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

 

W is for Wasted is the 23rd in the Kinsey Millhone series. Twenty third! While most series and their characters grow stale after a while, that’s far from the case with Kinsey. To say Sue Grafton has honed her craft is an understatement. Among her many awards are the Grand Master Award from Mystery Writers of America, and Bouchercon’s Lifetime Achievement Award. Over the years, I’ve read and enjoyed novels A through V, but W is her masterpiece.

Kinsey’s now 38, still unattached, still living the simple life with few encumbrances. And it’s still the 80’s in her home town of Santa Teresa, CA. As the book opens, she’s asked to identify a dead homeless man who carried her name and number in his pocket, but she’s never met him before. Since she’s between cases, Kinsey’s always active curiosity spurs her to find out what she can about the man. She also learns of the death of a sleazy PI whom she did know but didn’t like or trust. Too much free time can be a dangerous thing when you’re K.M.

Author Grafton incorporates the usual stock characters, whom her readers have come fondly to know well, and adds some interesting new ones, especially Ed the cat, some heretofore unknown cousins, and a trio of homeless people who lead her on quite an adventure. This is an intricate plot written on several levels with several disparate threads, and it’s a joy to observe how deftly Grafton is able to consolidate them by book’s end. It’s impossible to decide whether plotting or characterization, dialogue or description, is her outstanding forte, she’s so good at them all. If you like mysteries and haven’t yet had the pleasure of meeting Kinsey Millhone, treat yourself to W is for Wasted. It’s not necessary, though it is fun, to read this series in order. Sue Grafton’s Grand Master and Lifetime Achievement Awards, and all the others she’s been presented over the years, are richly deserved.

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It’s a Mystery: Sacrifice, by S. J. Bolton

SacrificeSacrifice by S.J. Bolton

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The British Isles are replete with folklore, and in the remoteness of the Shetland Islands, natives still tell tales about the Trows, little grey men who fear iron, love silver, and reside in the rolling hillsides. For their race to continue, the Trows must mate with human females. S. J. Bolton, whose given name is Sharon, builds her debut mystery around these legends to great effect.

Tora Hamilton is an OB/Gyn who relocates with her husband, who was born there, to the Shetlands. She enjoys her job at the local hospital, but finds island life rather isolating, especially when her husband’s off on one of his frequent business trips. It’s never been easy for Tora to make friends, and she still hasn’t achieved her dream of motherhood. She gets the shock of her life when she unearths the corpse of a woman in the peaty pasture where she rides her horses. With horror, she discovers that the woman, definitely not a prehistoric bog body, has a hole in her chest where her heart used to be. Equally disturbing, there are strange runes carved upon the victim’s back. When the autopsy reveals that the woman had given birth shortly before death, Tora is driven to find out what happened to her.

And so the story unfolds. The initial creepiness grows exponentially, as Tora refuses to take the advice of locals to leave well enough alone. It isn’t long before some grisly threats are made, which only serve to strengthen her resolve. Soon she finds herself in a deeply frightening “who do you trust” situation, until one of the policewomen on the case, equally suspicious, befriends her. Ms. Bolton makes effective use of the ambience of the Shetlands, embellishing the natural setting with a mysterious, private maternity hospital, some uncanny personal encounters, a pair of sinister in-laws, and the ever changing sea. All of which lead right up to an edge- of- your- seat, jaw clenching culmination and resolution.

It’s always been difficult for me to accept the suicidal choices that thriller characters make, and the motives attributed to the killers in this book never make total sense either. But Ms. Bolton has been compared as an author to no less than P.D. James, and after reading and experiencing Sacrifice, that seems fair to me.

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It’s a Mystery: Three Strikes and You’re Dead, by Michael A. Draper

Three Strikes and You're Dead;
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Someone is killing baseball superstars. There’s another players strike underway, and the self proclaimed Vindicator wants to teach a lesson to the greedy, overpaid sob’s who are ruining the sport, players and owners alike. Randy Larkin, insurance agent, is basking in the satisfaction of having successfully taken down a cop killer, when news about the baseball murders breaks and grabs his attention. Now Randy starts to think about becoming a real PI, and is itching to tackle this case.

Once you accept the premise that the FBI would actually accept assistance from rank amateurs, Three Strikes and You’re Dead takes on momentum. Working under the supervision of a licensed PI mentor, Randy, his brother Graham, and soon-to-be girlfriend Rosanne soon find themselves hot on the trail. The narration alternates between their efforts and those of the Vindicator and the terrorist who controls him. The feature that most grabbed my attention was the use that the novice investigators made of social media, especially Facebook, by setting up a discussion page about the crime and asking speculative questions of the participants. The plot moves along briskly and reaches its culmination in Grand Central Station.

The author, an online friend and fellow Connecticut resident, provided me with a copy to read and review objectively. I’m glad I did. The decency and unpretentious attitude of Randy Larkin makes him a refreshingly appealing character, and, since this is his second outing in a Mike Draper production, I hope there’s a series in the works.

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