Modern Lit: First Frost, by Sarah Addison Allenhile

First Frost (Waverley Family, #2)

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

First Frost is the sequel to Garden Spells, which introduced the Waverly women, who for generations have each possessed her own unusual talent. Garden Spells, which I read and reviewed back in 2008, was interesting enough, but for me stretched the bounds of credibility. First Frost, published last year, picks up the story of sisters Claire and Sydney, now settled into marriages, family life, and careers. While they find themselves generally happy and fulfilled, both women have a strong sense of unease. When a strange man shows up in town, the unease grows first into foreboding, and then into a full blown conflict of identity. Claire and Sydney each take comfort in the hope that, once the first frost of autumn occurs, they’ll be able to resolve their misgivings.

The strength of this book for me lies in its skillfully drawn characters. Claire and Sydney are intelligent, capable women who quite literally live and learn and grow from their experiences. Their husbands, daughters, and friends are equally genuine and appealing, especially Sydney’s daughter Bay who is in the throes of first love. The plot is well organized around the issue of identity, with descriptive passages that highlight the author’s skill with words. More restrained now are the hints of magic that flow through the story are more restrained than in the first book, and for me, work much better.

Although First Frost is not as outstanding as The Peach Keeper or The Sugar Queen, it’s certainly enjoyable and appealing.

You live in New England if…..

 

This was posted way back in 2007, but it certainly remains true and relevant today.

If your local Dairy Queen is closed from September through May, you live in
New England.

If someone in a Home Depot store offers you assistance and they don’t work
there, you live in New England.

If you’ve worn shorts and a parka at the same time, you live in New England.

If you’ve had a lengthy telephone conversation with someone who dialed a
wrong number, you live in New England.

If “Vacation” means going anywhere south of New York City for the weekend,
you live in New England.

If you measure distance in hours, you live in New England.

If you know several people who have hit a deer (or moose) more than once,
you live in New England.

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If you have switched from “heat” to “A/C” in the same day and back again,
you live in New England.

If you can drive 75 mph through 2 feet of snow during a raging blizzard
without flinching, you live in New England.

If you install security lights on your house and garage, but leave both
unlocked, you live in New England.

If you carry jumpers in your car and your wife knows how to use them, you
live in New England.

If you design your kid’s Halloween costume to fit over a snowsuit, you live in
New England.

If the speed limit on the highway is 55 mph — you’re going 80 and everybody
is passing you, you live in New England.

If driving is better in the winter because the potholes are filled with snow, you
live in New England.

If you know all 4 seasons: almost winter, winter, still winter and road
construction, you live in New England.

If you have more miles on your snow blower than your car, you live in New
England.

If you find 10 degrees “a little chilly”, you live in New England.

If you actually understand these jokes, and pass them on to all your New
England friends & others, you live in New England.

It’s a Mystery: The Girl on the Train, by Paula Hawkins

The Girl on the Train 5 of 5 stars

Rear Window meets Gone Girl in The Girl on the Train, the debut novel of former journalist Paula Hawkins. Rachel Watkins is the eponymous girl, in actuality a 30-something divorcee still reeling from the breakup of her marriage, for which she takes the blame, all of it. Her ex, Tom, remarried instantly and now resides where he and Rachel lived with his new wife, Anna, and year old daughter. Rachel can’t stop herself from hounding them with tearful, demanding phone calls, most placed in the middle of the night. The novel’s plot revolves around what Rachel sees everyday on the train to London, which passes by the back gardens of her former house and neighborhood. A strong first clue to Rachel’s state of mind lies in the fantasy she spins out daily about a couple she observes having coffee each morning from the deck of one of the other houses. Another comes when it becomes apparent how much wine and gin she’s habitually drinking. Finally, we learn that Rachel is taking the train each day to preserve the illusion that she still has the job that she lost because of her drinking problem. One morning she sees the woman, Megan, kissing a man not her husband, and a few days later, Rachel’s shocked to learn that Megan has, as they say in the UK, gone missing. She offers information about that stolen kiss to the police, who consider her an unreliable witness, so she chooses to tell Megan’s husband, Scott.

Rachel is the protagonist in the story, as unreliable a narrator as ever conjured up in the pages of a book. As she becomes immersed in the mystery, she grows more and more unstable, and begins having vivid flashbacks to traumatic experiences that she doesn’t remember. Her point of view, mainly stream of consciousness, alternates with those of Megan and Anna, who are as grounded in denial as Rachel is. All three characters are profoundly disturbed, though at first it appears that Anna and Megan are more functional than Rachel. Tom and Scott, while having no narrator duties, show themselves to be abusive and manipulative. What makes The Girl on the Train so compelling is the remarkable way in which Paula Hawkins presents the interplay among the characters and the manner in which they tailor their perceptions and behaviors to suit their personal needs and self images. Sometimes we all delude ourselves, of course, but these characters have lost their own integrity and connection to reality. We never can tell quite what is lurking right under their facades. As their narratives come together during the latter chapters, the suspense becomes intense, more so because there hasn’t been a lot of warning (few telling slip ups here) and we aren’t quite sure how any of these people will react. Despite the dark, depressive atmosphere, which never really eases, there are glimmers of hope at the end, but this is no easy beach read.

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History News: Site of Salem Hangings Identified

One of the most widely known events in American is the Salem Witchcraft Trials, which in 1692 resulted in the deaths of twenty victims, nineteen by hanging. What was never certain until now is the actual site of the gallows where the executions took place. With no evidence that gallows were ever constructed, it has long been assumed that a tree was used, perhaps one located at the summit of a landmark known as Gallows Hill.  Since 2010, a study has been ongoing to identify the execution site by studying court records and eye witness accounts, aerial photography, and advance mapping technology.

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photo:  John Blanding, Boston Globe.com

 

Major clues were found in two  reports that indicated that the witnesses observed the hangings from the windows of a house along Boston Street, which is located below a site called Proctor’s Ledge, which at the time was used as a public grazing area. It is not possible to see the top of Gallows Hill from that spot. Because the purpose of public executions was to encourage onlookers to stay on the straight and narrow,  it is unlikely that the summit was used as the hanging site.  Proctor’s Ledge is located in between what is now Proctor and Pope streets. It is hoped that the town of Salem will arrange for a proper memorial nearby.

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map: Patrick Garvin, Globe Staff

 

See this article for more information.

Great Nonfiction:New England Nation, by Bruce C. Daniels

New England Nation: The Country the Puritans Built
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Ever wonder why America always has to “save the world”? Why the town meeting style of government has survived on the local level for 300 years? Why Americans are so intent upon personal independence? Why higher education is so important to us? And what about due process of law?
While world views and social standards have changed drastically since Plymouth was settled, our core values, those that show up time and again in protests, demonstrations, and speeches have remained the same. Historian Bruce Daniels explains how this came to be in his 232 page narrative, a witty, fluent explanation of how the Puritans thought and why they behaved as they did, for good or bad. It’s not always a flattering picture, but it is a comprehensible one. Worth checking out for any reader of American history and sociology.

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It’s a Mystery: The Fabric of Sin, by Phil Rickman

The Fabric of Sin (Merrily Watkins, #9)

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

It’s a mystery to me why Phil Rickman remains largely unknown in America, seeing as how he’s a very talented writer who combines the mystery, paranormal, and historical fiction genres like nobody else. His Merrily Watkins series, set in present day England, features a female vicar charged with being the “deliverance” (read “exorcism”) minister in her parish and its environs. Merrily has a daughter, a young teen in the earlier novels and a young woman in the latest, and a significant other, former rock legend Lol Turner, who play prominent roles in all her deliverance activities. Other colorful characters from the church and the village round out the cast. Rickman’s characters are always richly developed, whether they are pro-or-an-tagonists.

In The Fabric of Sin, the action is placed in the Duchy of Cornwall, the province of Prince Charles, who looms large in the background of this investigation. The Reverend Mrs. Watkins is called out to look into a frightening paranormal incident that took place at the Master House in remote Garway. The Duchy owns this ancient property, rumored to have been inhabited by none other than the Knights Templar, and wants to clear matters up so that its restoration can continue unencumbered. Merrily finds this easier said than done, since the church, the villagers, and the Duchy all have their own hidden agendas. As usual, Mr. Rickman incorporates authentic and vivid atmosphere, historical background, psychological suspense, and subtle supernatural elements to produce an engrossing set of mysteries and murders for Merrily to tackle. This is a series that never disappoints.

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It’s a Mystery: Gone Girl, by Gillian Flynn

Gone GirlFatal attraction, two ways

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Nick and Amy approached their marriage in the same way most Americans do, by trying their hardest to please each other and submerging any personality traits or personal desires that might be viewed as negative. According to comedian Yakov Smirnoff, who also has a master’s degree in psychology, “Falling in love is a chemical reaction. But it wears off in a year. That’s why you need a strong line of communication… which includes laughter.” Like many couples, Nick and Amy never considered the possibility that the chemistry would change, and when it did, they checked out of their relationship without ever trying to adapt. This story is related by two supremely unreliable, self absorbed narrators, Nick and Amy themselves, who haven’t the faintest clue how to confront and resolve their problems. When they reach the end of the rope during their 5th year together, Nick plunges into a secret affair and Amy devises a diabolical way to teach her husband the lesson she believes he needs to learn.

The plot of Gone Girl is a like the one in the old movie, Fatal Attraction, but Amy is a much smarter avenger than the Glenn Close character. As in Fatal Attraction, Amy has ample reason for her fury against her lying, cheating husband, which is certainly justifiable, but she goes way over the top in the way she expresses it without ever recognizing her own role in their crash and burn. Throughout the first three quarters of Gone Girl, Amy is far and away the crazy one. Then the pathology deep in Nick’s character begins to assert itself, and by the denouement, many other people undeservedly become collateral damage in their catastrophe. This is a creepy, amoral couple who clearly deserve each other. Gillian Flynn handles all this mayhem with flair and elegance. Her presentation of Nick’s take on the marriage when juxtaposed with Amy’s makes the reader wonder if she’s talking about the same relationship; there is not a breath of honesty to be found. And the suspense, which at times is agonizing, never comes to an end , not even when the book does. What starts out slowly becomes un-put-downable. Noir fiction at its best.

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