Thriller: The Whisperer, by Donato Carrisi

The Whisperer
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Italian screen writer Donato Carrisi enters the serial killer genre with his first novel, The Whisperer, which has won multiple, well deserved literary prizes and has been published in multiple languages. The angle in which he presents this case is a fresh one, in which two criminology specialists join local police to track down a killer who has murdered 5 young girls and appears to have abducted an 6th. The perpetrator knows much more about the police than they do about him, and he delights in tormenting them with severed arms, dolled up corpses, and dead end leads. This main theme is surrounded by multiple subplots which involve individual investigators on the team, each as compelling and important as the main plot, and just as surprising. As a result, the reader experiences pretty much what the investigators experience. Furthermore, we are never informed as to where these crimes are taking place, though the atmosphere is more European than American; it’s easy, therefore, to understand the fact that this type of evil is universal. This is a tough book to enjoy, because of its horrific chain of evidence, but the constant cycle of dashed hopes, uncertainty, and psychological discoveries make it impossible to abandon. It could easily be the stuff of nightmares, but the writing is controlled enough to avoid turning it into a slasher movie. I wish I could have read The Whisperer in the original Italian, because while the translation is competent enough, you can tell that the translator is not a native speaker of English, and I suspect that some of Carrisi’s polish is dulled in places.

Recommended for readers interested in mysteries that challenge the intellect as well as grab and hold one’s interest. Not an easy book to forget, on par with The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo.

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Modern Lit: The Goldfinch, by Donna Tartt

The Goldfinch

My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Thirteen year old Theo Decker and his beloved mother are visiting the Metropolitan Museum of Art when a terrorist bomb explodes, killing her and most of those unfortunate enough to have been in the gallery. Theo finds himself on the debris strewn floor lying next to an elderly man who is obviously dying. As he tries to provide some comfort, the man gives him a signet ring and an address. Next to him on the floor is Fabritius’s tiny masterpiece, “The Goldfinch”, blown out of its frame but otherwise undamaged. The dying man indicates that Theo should take the painting and get out of the building while he still can. From that moment forward, the novel’s central metaphor takes hold, that being that , just as the bird is chained to its perch, Theo will be chained to the painting, his only tangible tie to his mother, for the rest of his life. What follows is the story of Theo’s coming of age.

The Goldfinch, Donna Tartt’s third novel, is very like her first two. Buried under a plot loaded with fantastic tribulations is an interesting situation, and Theo is a winsome protagonist. But it’s difficult to believe that this book won the Pulitzer. Heavily overwritten, its cliches, its redundancy, and its reliance on outrageous happenstance make it difficult to care what happens to poor Theo. I was willing to slog through all 700+ pages because I wanted to know the fate of the painting, and the final resolution was imaginative and surprising, but it was very tempting to skip to the ending. Good story, way overdone.

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It’s a Mystery: A Question of Belief, by Donna Leon

A Question of Belief (Commissario Brunetti, #19)

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

It’s always a pleasure to read a novel featuring Commissario Guido Brunetti, a goodhearted man for whom all police work is a question of ethics and justice. Like most of us, however, some of the jobs he’s called upon to undertake are more interesting than others. In A Question of Belief (19th in the series), Brunetti is stranded in the stifling Venetian August, his family vacationing in cool, fresh Alto Adige. As always, the case of the moment involves politics, bureaucratic corruption, and a social issue, in this case, homosexuality. As the book opens, crime on the island also appears to be on holiday, so Brunetti and Ispettore Vianello, his equally compassionate assistant, occupy themselves with nonviolent concerns, such as bribery in court cases and fraud on the part of psychic healers. Coincidentally, a brutal murder occurs, its victim a clerk at the very court they’re scrutinizing.

Donna Leon is equally adept at immersing her readers in the ambience of Venice and plotting an intricate, compelling police procedural. In Belief, for some reason, her focus seems to have been diverted from Brunetti’s case work to the dreadful heat of summer smothering the canals and piazzas. It’s easy enough to enjoy this novel for what it is, though it’s far from Leon’s best. A good summer diversion for us!

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It’s a Mystery: Restless, by William Boyd

Restless

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

How many of us believe that we know our own parents? Ruth Gilmartin tutors foreign students in English as a second language in 1970’s Oxford. Now a mom herself, she spend most of her off time caring for her four year old son, except for the one day each week when her own mother, Sally, takes care of him for her. One afternoon, Ruth arrives at Sally’s house to find her in a wheelchair, claiming to have suffered a fall. It’s clear that she’s bothered by something, but Sally’s not talking. Instead, she hands Ruth a manuscript to read when she has the time. This how how Ruth discovers that her mother isn’t Sally Gilmartin at all, but former Russian spy Eva Delectorskaya.

Though Restless has a few minor subplots, most of the novel relates Eva’s story, from her recruitment by British Intelligence in 1941 to her skilled execution of a program of disinformation designed to mislead the Germans. Eva falls into a love affair with her spymaster, the charismatic Lucas Romer, forgetting for a while that his number one axiom is “trust no one”. When one of Eva’s missions goes awry, Romer deems her expendable, and she’s forcer into spending the latter war years constructing another identity for herself in Canada. But Eva has a long memory, and in 1976, recruits daughter Ruth to help her get even.

Restless recreates the seamy, nerve-wracking world of high stakes espionage through Eva’s own experiences. Ruth’s life is not half so interesting, until she’s drawn into that world for a brief time herself. This is an action driven plot, and Eva is the only fully developed character in it. The result is a suspenseful spy thriller with a razor’s edge sort of ending, morally ambiguous but satisfying.

“When I was a child,” writes the narrator, Ruth, “and was being fractious and contrary and generally behaving badly, my mother used to rebuke me by saying: ‘One day someone will come and kill me and then you’ll be sorry’. Now, more than two decades later, she knows why.

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It’s a Mystery: Five, A Novel, by Ursula Archer

Five: A Novel

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A refinement of letterboxing, geocaching is a popular worldwide hobby that involves using GPS to hide and find small containers holding a logbook and, often, a small object that the finder can trade for another small object of equal value. The location coordinates are provided on a listing website, where finders can post about their hunt.

In Five, the caches contain human body parts. A geocacher, dubbed The Owner by the Salzburg police, dumps a body in a cow pasture, with a sequence of numbers tattooed on her feet. The investigative team, led by Beatrice Kaspary, soon figures out that the numbers are GPS coordinates, and, led by a rookie who’s into geocaching, they manage to make their first gruesome discovery. Along with a bloody hand, the killer provides a riddle, which when solved, will lead the cops to the next victim. And the next… DI Kaspary and her assistant, Florin Wessinger, will come to realize that the victims knew each other, but that’s all they have to go on.

Gritty and suspenseful, Five is a complex mystery with a flawed but personable protagonist. She and Florin make an efficient team, and there are some strong hints that their relationship will develop beyond the professional. When it becomes clear that The Owner is watching her, Beatrice begins to fear for the safety of her children. It’s possible for the reader to narrow down the roster of possible perpetrators, but I wasn’t certain till the end which of the two I suspected was guilty. An original premise with plenty to captivate and entertain those who open the covers of this thriller. It may also encourage some to take up a new hobby!

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It’s a Mystery: The Silkworm, by Robert Galbraith

The Silkworm (Cormoran Strike, #2)

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Cormoran Strike is a most interesting PI. A former investigator for the Royal Military, he lost a leg in Afghanistan and has now set up shop on his own. He’s tough, certainly, but also fair-minded and personable. He’s also the illegitimate son of a famous rock star. His newest case has been brought to his door by the wife of a pretentious but un-prolific author, Owen Quine, who’s disappeared after the rejection of his much anticipated new manuscript, Bombyx Mori , which translates to Silkworm. Strike is not at all sure that Mrs. Quine can pay, but he accepts the case anyway, and soon finds out that there are plenty of people in the world of publishing who might harbor animosity toward the writer. Bombyx, it seems, is a sort of pornographic allegory in which they all all appear as nasty caricatures of themselves.

The Silkworm is a mystery with literary features, the title itself a metaphor for the rat race of writing and publishing. Cormoran is the name of the giant that the famous Jack killed at St. Michael’s Mount in Cornwall. It takes a long time for Strike to discover what happened to Quine, and when he does, life mimics fiction in a very effective fashion. He receives indispensable insights and assistance from his office manager, Robin, who is a PI wanna be who clearly has the right stuff, if only Strike would realize it. Robin’s engagement to the selfish, narrow minded Matthew, serves as a subplot, and leads to speculation about whether Robin and Strike will follow up on the attraction they feel but do not openly acknowledge.
The Silkworm is a suspenseful and engaging, and I read it without knowing that it’s author is actually J. K. Rowling. I’m able, therefore, to review it objectively, and am prompted now to read the prequel, The Cuckoo’s Calling. Rowling clearly did not use up her story-telling abilities on Harry Potter, and she can write for adults quite well.

4 stars because of a bit of a lag in the middle.

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Folklore and Fantasy: The Ocean at the End of the Lane, by Neil Gaiman

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Our lives are shaped by our childhood impressions and experiences, and no one knows or expresses that truth better than Neil Gaiman. The protagonist in The Ocean at the End of the Lane is an unnamed, middle aged Englishman, who returns to his rural roots to attend a funeral. On a whim, he drives to the site of his former home, now a housing development where the country roads have been paved over, all except foThe Ocean at the End of the Laner the rustic lane that leads down the hill to the Hempstock farm. Old Mrs. Hempstock sees him arrive, and as they talk, snippets of memory begin to float to the surface. The summer he was seven, he and Hempstock granddaughter Lettie became friends, and he came to realize that there was something timeless about this family. They can see and do things that he can’t quite understand. Perhaps the duck pond, as Lettie insists, really is a sort of ocean. One morning, following a suicide in the neighborhood, a dark power is unleashed, and he and Lettie must embark upon a quest to vanquish something unspeakably evil.

What sounds like a prosaic sort of fairy story when I summarize it is much, much more in the hands of Neil Gaiman, though it does retain the key elements of the classic fairy tale. Mr. Gaiman writes beautifully, making every word count, and he is a master at conveying a genuine sense of the wonders and fears of childhood. His characters, which are few, are memorable and real. The action in Ocean vacillates between idyllic peace and heart stopping terror. Parents cannot always be counted on, and sometimes innocent mistakes bring serious consequences.There are omens (a fish that swallowed a sixpence), symbols (the number 3 is important), archetypes, and magic, but there is also a firm grounding in the ordinary. Emotionally powerful, mesmerizing, and highly recommended.

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