It’s a Mystery: Bury Your Dead, by Louise Penny

Bury Your Dead (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #6)

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

In this sixth novel in the series, Inspector Armand Gamache has a lot on his emotional plate. Following a harrowing case in which he and assistant Jean-Guy Beauvoir ( who is also Gamache’s son-in-law) nearly lost their lives, they’re both physically and psychologically drained. Gamache, as is his wont when things go wrong, blames himself, and at the urging of his wife, takes refuge with his now-retired mentor, Emile Comeau, in the beautiful city of Quebec. Beauvoir, going stir crazy in recovery, wants some work to do, so Gamache assigns him to do some further investigation into a now-solved murder, in the idyllic village of Three Pines. The book integrates, in alternating chapters, the three storylines, each of which has its own series of jolting discoveries. To my great enjoyment, Armand’s thread incorporates a lot of Quebec’s 18th century history, particularly the still- unsolved mystery of where the city’s founding father, Samuel de Champlain, was buried. Political issues, such as anti-English sentiment and Quebecois separatism, also play an important role.

Author Louise Penny is one of those few gifted writers who can meld plot threads seamlessly, making each relevant to the others. The appeal of her protagonists and her skills at breathing life into each of her settings, are now legendary among her followers. Though murder is at the center of her plots, her books are more character studies than police procedurals, though procedure is certainly given its due. All this is true of Bury Your Dead, a title that has meaning on several levels. This is an intricate, intelligent novel, though-provoking and disturbing on several levels, and surprisingly poetic in places. I won’t offer a plot synopsis, for fear of inadvertently spoiling it. Just read it – you won’t be disappointed.

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2 thoughts on “It’s a Mystery: Bury Your Dead, by Louise Penny

  1. I could be wrong, because it’s been a long time since I’ve read this, but I don’t think Beauvoir is Gamache’s son-in-law yet, by this book. He is only married to Gamache’s daughter the last few books in the series.

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