It’s a Mystery: The Cruelest Month, by Louise Penny

The Cruelest Month (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #3)

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The Canadian village of Three Pines may be idyllic, but it’s not immune from murder. As T.S. Elliott so famously wrote, “April is the cruelest month,” and as Easter approaches, the residents decide to hold a seance to rid their vacant, creepy manor house of the malevolent spirits that have wreaked such havoc among them. It’s a daunting prospect, but something that must be done. One of their number dies of fright, and early the next morning, Inspector Armande Gamache arrives on what has by now become for him a familiar crime scene.

The charm of Louise Penny’s series derives from her eloquent writing style. This woman knows her way around words. She breathes atmosphere into her setting and humanity into her characters, and her plots are always intricate enough to sustain the mystery even after you think you know who did it. Gamache has to be one of the warmest, most ethical and understanding detectives ever invented. His success is due to his principles, one of which is that murder always starts with a secret. Penny doesn’t shrink from illuminating his flaws, however, which makes him all the more human. The murder at the center of The Cruelest Month has him genuinely puzzled, and events during the investigation leave him wondering whom among his team can be trusted. Gamache, of course, eventually prevails, but not without some ingenious plotting of his own. As another famous author, Norman Mailer, once wrote,”In searching for the truth be ready for the unexpected.”

It’s not necessary to read the Three Pines novels in order, but that’s the way to get the most out of everything that Penny does so well.

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One thought on “It’s a Mystery: The Cruelest Month, by Louise Penny

  1. The advantage to reading the Three Pines novels in order is that you don’t notice who is missing from the village if you read a later book first. That is, I figured out the murderer for one book because that character didn’t appear in a later book. This is only a problem in a series set in a small village, and it only happened once, even though I read most of the series out of order. Love Three Pines!

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